Glazed and Infused Sells 8,000 Doughnuts in Opening Week

By Paul Biasco on January 28, 2013 6:54am | Updated on January 28, 2013 10:01am

LINCOLN PARK — An almost two-month delay in the long-awaited opening of Lincoln Park's Glazed and Infused location left the masses hungry for sugary goodness.

When the shop finally opened last weekend, lines poured out the front door, 939 W. Armitage Ave., and customers purchased about 8,000 doughnuts during the first week in business.

"It's ginormous," said James Gray, manager of the shop, when asked if he anticipated such a high turnout.

At the end of the first week in business, Glazed and Infused's Lincoln Park location had plowed through roughly 2,000 pounds of flour, 30 pounds of yeast and close to 1,000 eggs, according to Gray.

"It's been way beyond what we expected," he said. "We anticipated Armitage to do really well the grand opening weekend. We were crossing our figures that it would do just as well, maybe a little bit better, than our Fulton [813 W Fulton Market] store."

The gourmet doughnut shop, located just under the Armitage Brown Line stop, was first slated to open last summer, but that date got pushed back to late November after negotiations with the Chicago Transportation Authority took longer than expected.

The business, which has four other Chicago locations — Little Italy, Streeterville, the West Loop and Wicker Park — carries 12 staple doughnuts and has at least one specialty item a day. Some of the treats include a maple bacon long john, a creme brulee, vanilla bean glaze, red velvet, a seasonal glazed (which was a blueberry cake with lemon glaze on Sunday) and a cinnamon sugar cake doughnut.

"I read about them [the doughnuts], but never had them before," said Lincoln Park resident Max Keane, 22. "So good."

Keane ended up grabbing a free doughnut with his order Sunday afternoon, as the staff handed out many of the extras to customers just before its 2 p.m. close.

The Lincoln Park Glazed and Infused location brews Intelligentsia coffee, has seating for about 20 people and offers free Wi-Fi.

"We hear the two same phrases over and over again," Gray said, "that we hate you're here because we are going to keep coming in again and again to eat doughnuts, or that we are so glad you are here."

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