Quantcast

DNAinfo has closed.
Click here to read a message from our Founder and CEO

Wanna Dance Like Beyonce? Her Dance Captain Is Giving Classes This Weekend

 The dancer will offer two-day dance classes for all ages to raise money for the nonprofit Project 180 Chicago.
The dancer will offer two-day dance classes for all ages to raise money for the nonprofit Project 180 Chicago.
View Full Caption
Ashley Everett

CHICAGO — Want to dance like Queen Bey?

Ashley Everett, who serves as "dance captain" for Beyonce, is coming to Chicago Saturday and Sunday to teach dance classes.

Classes for all ages are taking place Saturday at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, 1147 W. Jackson Blvd., and Sunday at Visceral Dance Chicago, 2820 N. Elston Ave. Pre-registration is available by clicking here. Walk-Ins are welcomed as well. There are dance classes for all ages, and they start at $50 plus a processing fee.

Everett has been Beyonce's lead dancer for 10 years. The recently engaged dancer from California is partnering with local nonprofit Project 180 Chicago. The organization focuses on creating awareness about mental health and addiction, while breaking associated stigmas. Proceeds will go toward raising awareness and providing residential services to those recovering.

"While dance is what I do, I understand that it's not who I am," Everett said. "I feel so fortunate to have a platform that allows me to give a voice to the voiceless."

Living in Los Angeles, Everett said she sees a lot of homeless people.

"While it's so easy to just look past them, I often wonder why so many people are homeless and how they got there," Everett said. "Mental illness is real, and the stresses and pressures of this world easily influence the pursuit of temporary fixes, which usually leads to addictions."

People shouldn't be quick to judge or label those individuals, she said.

"While it's what they do to make it by, it's not who they are. And that's why I appreciate an organization like Project 180 Chicago for seeing the person behind the problem and making an effort to make a difference," Everett said.