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Immigration Agents Not Allowed In Schools Without Warrants, CPS Says

By  Kelly Bauer and Mina Bloom | February 22, 2017 9:24am | Updated on February 24, 2017 11:40am

 Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents aren't allowed into Chicago Public Schools without a warrant.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents aren't allowed into Chicago Public Schools without a warrant.
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DOWNTOWN — Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents aren't allowed into Chicago Public Schools without a warrant, officials told principals Tuesday.

CPS reminded schools of the policy in an email to principals, reiterating that it will not "provide assistance to [immigration agents] in the enforcement of federal civil immigration law" and will support students during a tumultuous time.

School staff were told to not let the agents into CPS facilities unless they have a "verified, criminal warrant" — and the agents should have to wait outside while the school contacts the Law Department and reviews the situation.

Schools were also told to tell parents to update emergency contacts for children so if a parent is detained by immigration — potentially leaving a child stranded at school — the school's officials can "exhaust the child's emergency contact list."

The move comes as the Trump administration released guidelines to immigration agents Tuesday outlining the procedure to make good on Donald Trump's campaign promise to expel millions of people who are illegally in the country.

Officials from the federal Department of Homeland Security told reporters that the agency is focusing mostly on those considered threats though acknowledged that anyone in the country illegally could be deported.

The Trump administration appears to be making an exception for those who were brought into country illegally as children, a group known as "dreamers."

Chicago, a sanctuary city, has pushed back against anti-immigrant measures.

Last week, more than 50,000 CPS students stayed home for "A Day Without Immigrants." Students said parents were concerned immigration agents would come to their homes that day, a teacher said.