Pilsen Man Hung On for Month After Shooting

By Lizzie Schiffman on January 8, 2013 1:03am 

 Relatives say Bernardo Colin, 33, of Pilsen, was a hard worker who did little more than travel from his job washing cars back to his apartment on Throop at Cullerton. They believe he was shot in Englewood while waiting to transfer buses after missing his stop.
Relatives say Bernardo Colin, 33, of Pilsen, was a hard worker who did little more than travel from his job washing cars back to his apartment on Throop at Cullerton. They believe he was shot in Englewood while waiting to transfer buses after missing his stop.
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CHICAGO — A 33-year-old Pilsen man lingered for about a month after suffering injuries he sustained in an October shooting in Englewood.

Police say Bernardo Colin was shot in the abdomen on Oct. 13 at 6101 S. Ashland Ave. Colin, who washed cars for a living, was rushed to Advocate Christ Medical Center, where he was taken directly into surgery.

He was pronounced dead at 12:05 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office.

Colin's family believes the he was killed because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

His aunt, Balbina Mata, 42, told DNAinfo.com that Colin often fell asleep while taking the Ashland bus home from his job washing cars on the North Side, and would to transfer buses at 61st Street and Ashland Avenue to head back to the apartment on Throop.

In the time between the October shooting and his death, Colin was conscious for one week, but was unable to provide any information about the incident, Mata said. Police could not provide a description of the offender and do not have anyone in custody, but detectives continue to investigate.

"He would normally just go to work and home," Mata said, as translated by neighbor Marisol Perez, 28.

"He was a great guy, good with kids, a music person" who loved Mexican regional music, Mata said.

The family describes Colin as a hardworking family man, and don't believe he was the intended target. Police say Colin had no prior convictions and was not believed to have any gang affiliations.

He immigrated to the U.S. from his hometown, Guerrero, Mexico, 10 years ago, Mata said. He was especially close with Mata's young daughter, whom he called "chiva," which means "little goat."

 

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