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DJ Dave Fogel, A Prostate Cancer Survivor, Says Get Tested Now

By Jessica Cabe | September 8, 2017 5:09pm | Updated on September 11, 2017 8:52am
 KHITS DJ and Lakeview resident Dave Fogel ran in Sunday's SEA Blue Prostate Cancer Run, and he spoke from the stage about his own experience with prostate cancer.
KHITS DJ and Lakeview resident Dave Fogel ran in Sunday's SEA Blue Prostate Cancer Run, and he spoke from the stage about his own experience with prostate cancer.
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Provided/Dave Fogel

LAKEVIEW — Anyone who listens to KHITS morning DJ Dave Fogel knows he’s a unique character, but he’s like a lot of men in one respect: He didn’t think prostate cancer would happen to him.

“When I got diagnosed, I pretty much thought they had the wrong guy,” said Fogel, 56. “I’m a real healthy guy. I go to the gym every day, I pretty much eat right. Prostate? I didn’t even know what one was or where it was. I knew nothing.”

The Lakeview resident was diagnosed with prostate cancer about a year ago, and he had surgery to remove the cancer in February. Just six months later, he ran 5K at 1790 N. Stockton Drive in Lincoln Park, the 13th annual SEA Blue Chicago Prostate Cancer Walk and Run. He also spoke from the stage about the importance of getting tested and catching prostate cancer early.

“The fact that I found it early, I mean, guys can die from this if you don’t,” Fogel said. “I kind of feel like I got lucky. I didn’t really know much, and then all of a sudden I had it. So I’m just making sure other people know. That’ll save their lives.”

In addition to raising money for Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network, Sunday’s walk and run in Lincoln Park offered free blood tests that serve as an indicator for whether or not someone may have prostate cancer. These tests, called PSA tests, are what led to Fogel undergoing the biopsy that ultimately diagnosed him.

Fogel is still taking regular PSA tests to ensure the surgery was successful. He said his tests are still coming back a little high, so he’ll have to visit a radiation oncologist soon to make sure his cancer is completely gone.

After this experience, educating others on the importance of being tested for prostate cancer has become a significant part of life for Fogel, who is on the radio from 5-10 a.m. weekdays at 104.3 FM. That’s why he was happy to speak at Sunday’s walk and run.

“The whole awareness issue is so huge,” he said. “I just knew nothing about prostate cancer. So I just knew I had to help [SEA Blue] when they told me it was about awareness.”