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CTA's New History Instagram Page Shares Old-School, Epic Photos

By Justin Breen | March 7, 2017 10:10am
 On October 31, 1993, CTA opened a new 'L' line from the Loop to Midway--the first completely new 'L' line since the Dan Ryan Line (today's South Side Red Line) opened in 1969, and the first time the 'L' was extended into a part of the city previously not served since 1984 (when today's Blue Line was extended to O'Hare).
On October 31, 1993, CTA opened a new 'L' line from the Loop to Midway--the first completely new 'L' line since the Dan Ryan Line (today's South Side Red Line) opened in 1969, and the first time the 'L' was extended into a part of the city previously not served since 1984 (when today's Blue Line was extended to O'Hare).
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Instagram/CTA

DOWNTOWN — The CTA has unveiled a new Instagram page devoted to old-school photos of days, trains and buses gone by.

The Instagram page, which features old-school photos of CTA trains and buses, debuted in honor of the CTA's 70th anniversary this year.

“For 70 years, Chicagoans have turned to the CTA to get them where they’ve needed to go,” said CTA President Dorval R. Carter Jr. in a news release. “Our 70th anniversary gives us the chance to not only look back at our proud history, but also to look ahead to the improvements and investments we’re making to serve customers for another 70 years.”

CTA began operations on Oct. 1, 1947, taking over operations by the Chicago Rapid Transit Company (which ran the ‘L’ system) and the Chicago Surface Lines (which ran the streetcar system and some bus lines), according to a release.

Check out some of the photos below or click here:

 

 

Lake Street 'L' at Central, pre-elevation (ca. 1960) This photo shows a Lake Street 'L' train at Central, in Chicago's Austin neighborhood on the West Side, before the part of the route west of Laramie was elevated. At Laramie, train conductors would raise the trolley poles (the station had both third rail and overhead wire to make the transition to running along the street) and trains would descend to grade level where they'd travel alongside Lake Street and the Chicago & North Western railroad embankment, out to a terminal station in Forest Park, just west of Harlem. In 1962, trains were diverted onto the North Western's right-of-way (now Union Pacific), where they operate to the Harlem/Lake terminal, as part of the CTA Green Line, today. The line serves Oak Park, River Forest and Forest Park. Photo courtesy Bruce G. Moffat. #cta #cta70 #ctahistory #chicago #ctagreenline #train #trolleywire

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Rt. 40 O'Harexpress at O'Hare in Bicentennial Colors This MAN articulated bus was assigned to the #40 O'Harexpress service, which ran express between Jefferson Park on the West-Northwest 'L' Route (today's Blue Line) and O'Hare, before the extension from Logan Square to O'Hare was completed. This photo shows the the bus, in Bicentennial livery, posing in front of the bridge used by planes (such as this McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10 in @united service) to cross I-190 at O'Hare. The 'L' would later run down space in the middle of this expressway and service on the 40 would be discontinued once you could take a train directly into the airport. #cta #chicago #ord #ctahistory #airports #airplanes #unitedairlines #ohare #ohareairport #bus #bendybus #articulatedbus #ctablueline #cta70 #roadway #tarmac #taxiway #airplane #ctablueline

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