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Chicago's Oldest Landmarked Buildings Might Surprise You (MAP)

By  Tanveer Ali and Justin Breen | January 27, 2017 6:54am 

 Some of Chicago's oldest landmarked buildings (from top left clockwise): Noble-Seymour-Crippen House (1833); Page Brothers Building (1872); Charles D. Iglehart House (1857); and Henry B. Clarke House (around 1836)
Some of Chicago's oldest landmarked buildings (from top left clockwise): Noble-Seymour-Crippen House (1833); Page Brothers Building (1872); Charles D. Iglehart House (1857); and Henry B. Clarke House (around 1836)
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DNAinfo/Justin Breen and Tanveer Ali; Wikimedia Landmarks Illinois

DOWNTOWN — Chicago's oldest landmarked buildings aren't just Downtown.

In fact, most of Chicago's 12 oldest landmarked buildings are nowhere near the city's hub.

The list of the city's oldest landmarked buildings was provided by Landmarks Illinois, a nonprofit that works to protect historic buildings, and confirmed by Peter Strazzabosco, the city's deputy planning and development commissioner.

There are also post- and pre-1871 fire cottages in the city that are not landmarked that could even be older than the landmarked buildings, according to Landmarks Illinois.

The oldest landmarked building is the 1833 Noble-Seymour-Crippen House, 5624 N. Newark Ave. in Norwood Park. Eight other landmarked buildings were built in or before 1871. Three buildings — Holden Block, 1027 W. Madison St.; Delaware Building, 36 W. Randolph St.; and Page Brothers Building, 177-191 N. State St. — were all built in 1872, and it's not known which of the three was finished first, Strazzabosco said.

“Chicago has been at the crossroads of American progress. Our built environment demonstrates our place as a center of commerce, transportation and design — it’s what distinguishes us from other cities in the nation, and it’s our responsibility to protect that," said Bonnie McDonald, president and CEO of Landmarks Illinois.

"People travel from all around the world to see our architecture. They are drawn to our historic buildings that have survived for more than a century. Without these 'old' buildings, Chicago wouldn’t be ‘Chicago.’”

Here's the list:

1. Noble-Seymour-Crippen House — 5624 N. Newark Ave., 1833. Addition, 1863; architects unknown.

2. Henry B. Clarke House — 1855 S. Indiana Ave., circa 1836; architect unknown.

3. John Wingert House — 6231 N. Canfield Ave., 1854. Addition, circa 1868- 1875; architects unknown.

4. Jane Addams’ Hull House and Dining Room — 800 S. Halsted St. House, 1856; architect unknown. Dining Hall, 1905; Pond and Pond.

5. Charles D. Iglehart House — 11118 S. Artesian Ave., 1857; architect unknown.

6. Rosehill Cemetery Entrance — 5800 N. Ravenswood Ave., 1864; William W. Boyington.

7. Old Chicago Water Tower District — Michigan and Chicago avenues. Water tower and pumping station, 1869; William W. Boyington.

8. John Raber House — 5760 S. LaFayette Ave., 1870. Major Alterations, 1894; Thomas Wing.

9. Charles Hitchcock House — 5704 W. Ohio St., 1871; architect unknown.

10 (tie). Holden Block — 1027 W. Madison St., 1872; Stephen Vaughn Shipman.

10 (tie). Delaware Building — 36 W. Randolph St., 1872-1874; Wheelock and Thomas. Two-story addition and atrium, 1889; Julius H. Huber.

10 (tie). Page Brothers Building — 177-191 N. State St., 1872; John M. Van Osdel. State Street facade, 1902; Hill & Waltersdorf.

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