Quantcast

Help Us Rename Our Biosolid, But Be Nice, Says Water Reclamation District

By Joe Ward | July 30, 2016 9:18am | Updated on July 30, 2016 12:10pm
 Now that their nutrient-rich product can be sold to the public, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Chicago is seeking help in renaming the product.
Now that their nutrient-rich product can be sold to the public, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Chicago is seeking help in renaming the product.
View Full Caption
Metropolitan Water Reclamation Dsitrict of Greater Chicago

CHICAGO — Now that their nutrient-rich biosolid can be sold to the public, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago needs your help in renaming the product.

Don't laugh.

Recent changes in state law have made it legal for the water filtration agency to sell "biosolid," a nutrient-rich product comprised of compounds filtered from drinking water, the reclamation district said. It's made from microbes that are put into the water by the district, specifically to filter out nutrients.

The product is much cheaper, and perhaps an even more effective, alternative to chemicals used to fertilize soil, the district said. Now that the product can be sold to the public, the agency is hoping to come up with a more marketable name. 

The district has launched a campaign asking the public to suggest new names for the product. Submissions should be sent to public.affairs@mwrd.org. by Aug. 30.

In Milwaukee, the product was renamed "Milorganite," and in Washington, D.C., the product is called "bloom."

"Contestants are urged to be appropriate but creative," a spokesperson said.

Biosolids are essentially the run off that is filtered out of water at filtration centers, according to the district. The compound is air-dried and looks like dark, "fine-textured" topsoil. 

Biosolid is a sustainable alternative to chemical-based fertilizers that has been used to fertilize municipal golf courses, parks and other recreational facilities.

"At a time when there is growing scrutiny over fertilizers and pesticides, we are supporting a natural trend that is both resourceful to our environment and also to our taxpayers," said Mariyana Spyropoulos, water reclamation president. 

For more neighborhood news, listen to DNAinfo Radio here: