L Train Riders Jarred by Subway Death at Bedford Avenue

By Meredith Hoffman on March 26, 2012 3:49pm 

Cops have posted photos of the suspect who instigated a fight that spilled onto the train tracks at the Bedford Avenue L station.
Cops have posted photos of the suspect who instigated a fight that spilled onto the train tracks at the Bedford Avenue L station.
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DNAinfo/Meredith Hoffman

WILLIAMSBURG — Straphangers at the Brooklyn subway station where a Queens man was struck and killed by a train after a fight on the tracks were rattled Monday as cops sought the suspect who sparked the fatal fracas.

Officers blanketed the area around the Bedford Avenue station with sketches of the suspect, who allegedly picked a fight with Joshua Basin, 20, last Friday night — a skirmish that spilled from a Brooklyn-bound train onto the tracks.

"It makes me want to leave the city," said Ashley Williams, who was uneasy boarding the L train Monday.  "It kind of sucks."

Basin was struck and killed by a Manhtattan-bound train in front of horrified onlookers before he could climb back onto the platform, witnesses said. 

The suspect, described as 30 to 35 with a thin build and dirty blond hair, was pestering straphangers on a Brooklyn-bound train and pushed Basin and another man out of the car at Bedford Avenue, telling them, "It’s show time," a witness told DNAinfo.

Before being pushed off the train, Basin was heard telling the apparently drunk aggressor, “Stop it.  Stop it, man,” a witness said.

"It's weird that there'd be someone so aggressive here," said Mieka Jewett, 23, of Williasmburg as she waited for a train to go to work in Manhattan. "Everyone around here's chill. I usually feel safe."

Another Williamsburg resident, Robin McNicol, 27, who was standing by a wanted poster, said she hopes the man is found. "That's really messed up."

Her friend, Rachel Pestik, 26, was unaware of he incident because she was out of town.

"I'm shocked," she said. "I'm here every day—but it's not going to affect my routine."

For native New Yorker Chaz Mee, 42, a regular L train rider, the mayhem in the subway was reminiscent of the city's past.

"Stuff like this used to happen a lot more in the 80's. The subway used to be dangerous," he said. "Now this is a rare instance."

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