Quantcast

DNAinfo has closed.
Click here to read a message from our Founder and CEO

Amy Langfield

News Editor @amylangfield Contact

Amy Langfield is a News Editor at DNAinfo and previously worked at CNBC.com, NBCNews.com, Reuters, the Los Angeles Daily News and other newsrooms.

She has covered business, technology, urban planning, transportation, travel, crime and lots of weird animal stories. She was a member of the team that won a Peabody Award at NBCNews.com for its In Plain Sight series on poverty in America.

She founded and ran the now-defunct NewYorkology website, which won three Lowell Thomas awards from the Society of American Travel Writers and was a Shorty award finalist for its Twitter feed.

Her post-college journalism career started in Czechoslovakia, at the country’s first independent English-language newspaper. The paper was founded by friends from her college newspaper and she started the business section when she arrived.

Fun Fact: Amy was stuck underground in the last car of a Q train during the 2003 blackout. Although there was talk of cannibalism, no one was injured or eaten.

Downtown »

October 4, 2017

Reservations open Thursday at 11 a.m. for locations with limited availability on Oct. 14 and 15.

Murray Hill, Gramercy & Midtown East »

September 20, 2017

Owners now think the bar first opened as Burckel Brothers' Cafe in 1892.

Downtown »

September 11, 2017

The polls will be open Tuesday from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens & Red Hook »

August 23, 2017

Installation of the semi-permanent wall started Monday along the neighborhood's lowest-lying street.

Fordham & Tremont »

July 5, 2017

Alexander Bonds shot officer Miosotis Familia through an open window in a NYPD vehicle, police said.

Downtown »

June 28, 2017

About 80 feet of water inundated the station in October 2012.

Harlem »

June 27, 2017

The "summer of hell" hasn't yet begun, but MTA riders are already giving the governor hell.

Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens & Red Hook »

June 20, 2017

Protecting the area is complicated because "Red Hook also floods from underneath," a city official said.