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Trump Support in New York City Comes From The Usual Republican Voting Blocs

By Jeff Mays | November 16, 2016 9:55am
 New York City was a sea of blue for Hillary Clinton in Tuesday's presidential election. The former New York state senator received 78.5 percent of the vote compared to just 18.4 percent for fellow New Yorker and now President-elect Donald Trump. But some parts of the city are Trump country. On Staten Island, Trump won almost 57 percent of the vote compared to 40 percent for Clinton.
New York City was a sea of blue for Hillary Clinton in Tuesday's presidential election. The former New York state senator received 78.5 percent of the vote compared to just 18.4 percent for fellow New Yorker and now President-elect Donald Trump. But some parts of the city are Trump country. On Staten Island, Trump won almost 57 percent of the vote compared to 40 percent for Clinton.
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DNAinfo/Tanveer Ali

CITY HALL — Some parts of the city are Trump country.

Despite the fact that the former New York senator received 78.5 percent of the vote compared to just 18.4 percent for her opponent, the President-elect still has strong support in three of the five boroughs.

On Staten Island, Donald Trump won almost 57 percent of the vote compared to 40 percent for Clinton.

Trump support was also strong in parts of Southern Brooklyn, including Orthodox Jewish parts of Crown Heights and Williamsburg. And parts of Queens hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy such as Breezy Point and Belle Harbor, also cast their votes for Trump, who has called man-made climate change a "hoax."

The pattern speaks to how Republican voters in New York City have been baked into a few neighborhoods in the city for decades now, a DNAinfo map of the election results shows.

"They would have voted for any Republican candidate," said Kenneth Sherrill, professor emeritus of political science at Hunter College.

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Steven Romalewski, mapping director at CUNY's Graduate Center, agreed.

"The patterns are generally the same, strong GOP support along the South shore of Staten Island, large Orthodox communities in Brooklyn and a couple of spots in Queens," he said. "Breezy Point voted heavily against Obama and heavily against Clinton."

Sherrill said he was somewhat surprised that the Orthodox community voted for Trump. Mayor Bill de Blasio, a Clinton surrogate, did well in the Orthodox parts of Brooklyn during his 2013 election.

►READ MORE: Ex-Affordable Housing Complex Has One of Manhattan's Highest Trump Votes

"The Orthodox are very conservative and it's odd that people who think its immodest for women to ride bicycles in the streets of their neighborhood would vote for a man's whose wife appeared nude," said Sherrill.

Clinton, who represented New York in the U.S. Senate, didn't pick up any ground in the city, getting about the same number of votes, just over 1.9 million, that Obama received in 2012.

►READ MORE: In NYC's Trump Stronghold, Some Neighborhoods Go Strongly Blue

But unlike Clinton, Obama won Staten Island four years ago with 51 percent of the vote.

"It's interesting given the build up for the campaign that she's a New Yorker and everyone was going to turn out for her. It's surprising that she didn't do better. Even though support was very strong it seemed like she would do better but she did the same," said Romalewski

Staten Island is an unusual place politically, experts say. Even though much of the borough votes Republican in federal elections, there are approximately 48,000 more registered Democrats than Republicans.

►READ MORE: In NYC's Trump Stronghold, Some Neighborhoods Go Strongly Blue

"A lot of these folks are what you would consider traditional Democrats 20 years ago. They are union law enforcement, police or fire, but they have a different opinion of what type of government we should have," said Evan Thies, co-founder of Pythia Public Affairs, a political consulting firm.