Man Wanted to Die After Learning He'd Fatally Hit MTA Bus Driver, NYPD Says

By Trevor Kapp on March 12, 2014 3:27pm 

 The family of bus driver William Pena said they're happy his killer will remain in jail, but that it won't ease their pain.
The family of bus driver William Pena said they're happy his killer will remain in jail, but that it won't ease their pain.
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DNAinfo/Trevor Kapp

MANHATTAN SUPREME COURT — He didn't want to live with the guilt.

The nephew of model Tyson Beckford who struck and killed an MTA bus operator with a stolen truck he drove while drunk last month told police, “Just let me die,” after learning M14 driver William Pena had died in the crash, prosecutors said.

Domonic Whilby, 22, told police he had no recollection of the accident or how he even ended up behind the wheel before striking the bus on 14th Street and Seventh Avenue on Feb. 12 about 6 a.m, prosecutors said.

Whilby, of Griffin, Georgia, was indicted on second-degree murder charges Wednesday and was ordered held without bail by Supreme Court Justice Gregory Carro, who said Whilby’s desire to die was an indication he didn’t want to own up to his actions.

“That statement is a telling one. It tells me he doesn’t want to face these charges," Carro said. “I think he is a risk. I think remand is appropriate.”

Pena’s widow, Nancy Rodriguez, and their 17-year-old daughter, Gabrielle, cried throughout much of the arraignment, as dozens of MTA workers in the audience stared down Whilby.

“I’m happy he was remanded,” Rodriguez said afterward. “But that will never bring William back.”

Gabrielle Pena, added: “I’m very disappointed. I want my dad back, but that’s not possible.”

Whilby also faces charges for aggravated vehicular homicide, second-degree vehicular manslaughter and grand larceny.

He is due back in court May 14.

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