Build Your Own Pot Rack for Under $60

By Elizabeth Wolff on February 5, 2013 6:55am 

NEW YORK CITY — Pot racks are often too large and cumbersome for narrow New York City kitchens, yet the lack of space begs for them.

Shopping for pot racks recently, I noticed that all the more affordable models felt, and looked, cheap. The more expensive options — starting at $175 — not only broke the bank but felt too thick and heavy for small spaces.

So I took a trip to the Home Depot and bought the materials to make one myself. I purchased galvanized pipe and matching fittings — to go with our stainless steel appliances. It cost $57.53 and required the same amount of measuring and drilling as a prefab rack.

There's no one way to build your own rack — there are dozens of fittings to screw into each other and you should have fun with it. However you build it, you'll most certainly need an elbow and flange for each end that is secured to the wall. The elbow connects the pipe to the flange. A flange is a circular disks that come in many shapes and materials. Mostly used for plumbing, they secure pipes to the floor or wall - and that's exactly what we'll use it for.

Follow these simple steps to getting a lean, minimal pot rack for a fraction of the price.

What you'll need:

One 1/2-inch galvanized pipe at your desired length.

Two 1/2-inch galvanized floor flanges.

Two 1/2-inch galvanized 90-degree elbows.

.273 x 2 3/4-inch S-hooks, as many as you want.

Drill bit for desired wall.

At least eight screws and eight anchors specific for the material of the wall.

Electric drill.

Pencil.

A level (or get the free iHandy app).

Step 1:

Determine where you want your pot rack to go, make sure it's level and trace the holes for the screws on the left flange.

Step 2:

Drill holes for the four screws where you've drawn your pencil marks. Wiggle the drill and make sure you've gone deep enough. Place the anchors in the holes and make sure they go in all the way — a little sticking out is OK.

Step 3:

Match the holes up to the floor flange (detach it from the pot rack for ease) and drill in screws. Make sure you leave each of them loose until all four screws are in, then tighten them up.

 DNAinfo.com contributor Elizabeth Wolff took a trip to the hardware store to buy galvanized pipe and matching fittings to make a custom pot rack. It cost $57.53 and required the same amount of measuring and drilling as a much pricier prefab rack.
DNAinfo.com contributor Elizabeth Wolff took a trip to the hardware store to buy galvanized pipe and matching fittings to make a custom pot rack. It cost $57.53 and required the same amount of measuring and drilling as a much pricier prefab rack.
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DNAinfo/Janet Upadhye

Step 4:

Now reattach your pot rack components — the flange to the elbow to the pipe — on the left side. Before you attach the parts on the right side, slip s-hooks onto the galvanized pipe so they are permanent and sturdy for your pots and pans. The s-hooks won't snap onto the pipe once it's installed.

Repeat steps 2 and 3 on the right side, only this time your rack will be fully attached to the flange when you drill in your screws.

Voila! Start hanging your pots and pans and clear out that much-needed cabinet space.

 This galvanized pipe-and-hook rack is sturdy, industrial chic, and costs less than $60.
This galvanized pipe-and-hook rack is sturdy, industrial chic, and costs less than $60.
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DNAinfo/Janet Upadhye

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