Black People Targeted in More Than Half of Stop-and-Frisks, NYPD Says

By Ben Fractenberg on February 5, 2013 7:37am 

 Cops frisk two men in stop-and-frisk training in the Bronx. The NYPD says stop-and-frisks reduce crime, but civil rights advocates say the tactic leads to racial profiling.
Cops frisk two men in stop-and-frisk training in the Bronx. The NYPD says stop-and-frisks reduce crime, but civil rights advocates say the tactic leads to racial profiling.
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New York Daily News Archive/Getty Images

NEW YORK CITY — New stop-and-frisk numbers released by the NYPD Monday gave a racial breakdown of the targets in 2011— and showed more than 50 percent of them were black.

Though they account for just 23.4 percent of the city's residential population, black New Yorkers were affected by more than half of 686,000 stops, the report said.

Latinos made up nearly 40 percent. Whites were nearly 10 percent.

"The nearly 686,000 stops conducted in 2011 equated to less than one stop per police officer per week among the 19,600 officers on patrol during the period," said Paul Browne, the NYPD's chief spokesman.

While police portrayed the number of stops as being low in relationship to the number of officers on the streets, stop-and-frisks have risen dramatically since Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office, jumping from 98,000 during his first term to nearly 700,000 by 2011.

Suspected weapons possession was cited as the top reason for stops, accounting for 25.6 percent.

Brooklyn's 75th Precinct in East New York had the most stops with 31,100, while the 73rd Precinct just next-door in Brownsville came in second with 25,167.

Jackson Heights, Queens, had the third most with 18,156.

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