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Man Who Tortured Wife's Chihuahua Convicted of Animal Cruelty, DA Says

By Nicholas Rizzi | April 12, 2017 2:30pm
 Jerry Moore was convicted for animal cruelty after he killed his wife's 2-month-old puppy, Bambi.
Jerry Moore was convicted for animal cruelty after he killed his wife's 2-month-old puppy, Bambi.
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Staten Island District Attorney's Office

STATEN ISLAND — A man who choked his wife's 2-month-old Chihuahua before throwing it into a wall, causing the pooch to be euthanized for its injuries, has been found guilty of animal cruelty, officials said.

Jerry Moore, 39, was convicted after a week-long trial on charges of torturing his wife's dog, Bambi, and faces between two to four years in prison, District Attorney Michael McMahon announced.

"This defendant mercilessly abused a defenseless puppy named Bambi over several weeks, causing such severe injuries that a veterinarian was forced to euthanize the two-month old Chihuahua," McMahon said in a statement. "Today’s top-count felony conviction holds Mr. Moore accountable for his brutal actions and ensures that he will be put behind bars."

On March 12, 2016 Moore strangled the 2-pound puppy, then threw her into a wall of their Jersey Street apartment on March 23, prosecutors said.

Moore also threatened his wife and told her to "watch what she says to the police," according to the DA's office.

Moore's wife said she left the apartment on March 24, 2016, Bambi was in good health, but when she returned found Bambi crying and unable to move.

She took the dog to a veterinarian to be treated for a brain injury but Bambi had to euthanized on March 26, prosecutors said.

The ASPCA later determined the cause of death to be traumatic brain injury as a result of blunt force trauma.

During this time period, Moore was also in violation of an full order of protection against his wife.

He was convicted for aggravated cruelty to animals, criminal contempt and overdriving, torturing and injuring animals on Wednesday. He's scheduled to be sentenced April 26.

Last year, McMahon partnered with the NYPD and ASPCA to open a dedicated unit to prosecute animal abusers, who he said are five times more likely to commit other violent crimes in the future.