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Traveling Makers' Market Hosts Designers and Artists in Boerum Hill

 f.a.d. weekend at Invisible Dog Art Center in Boerum Hill. The makers' market will be back this weekend in the gallery.
f.a.d. weekend at Invisible Dog Art Center in Boerum Hill. The makers' market will be back this weekend in the gallery.
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f.a.d.

BOERUM HILL — A roving Brooklyn flea market that focuses on local and emerging makers will showcase dozens of designers and artists in the neighborhood this weekend.

The market, called f.a.d. weekend, which stands for "fashion, art, design," will host more than 40 exhibitors at Invisible Dog Art Center, located at 51 Bergen St., from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 13 and 14, said the market's founder Jen Bailey.

"We are a platform for small businesses," she said. "We want to be that support system for local makers."

Handmade goods and artwork ranging from print and photography to furniture, jewelry, ceramics and clothes for kids and adults will be featured over the weekend. There will also be a mobile plant truck from Tula parked outside the gallery.

Food and drinks will also be available, including Mexican paletas from La NewYorkina and free bottles of Runa iced tea.

"We do try and represent a range of different products that people make," Bailey said.

A handful of vendors at the upcoming market have social messages attached to their brands, such as New Market Goods, which sells clothing and textiles made in Dhaka, Bangladesh and seeks to highlight positive production practices, according to its website.

Bailey also works to regularly rotate about half the exhibitors at each market so regular visitors can always find something new, she said. 

The market launched in May as a traveling market that would spend two months at different venues throughout Brooklyn. The market's first location was the ISSUE Project Room in Downtown Brooklyn.

The f.a.d. weekend will return to the Invisible Dog Art Center on Aug. 27 and 28.

While organizers have yet to determine the next venue for September and October, Bailey hopes to keep it in south Brooklyn.