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Man Who Created Mister Softee's Ice Cream Truck Jingle Dies at 94

By Valeria Ricciulli | April 28, 2016 3:36pm | Updated on April 29, 2016 5:18pm
 A Philadelphia native, Les Waas wrote the jingle for the song we've all heard coming from the Mister Softee ice cream trucks.
A Philadelphia native, Les Waas wrote the jingle for the song we've all heard coming from the Mister Softee ice cream trucks.
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Mister Softee/Broadcast Pioneers

NEW YORK CITY — The man behind the jingle ingrained in the minds of New Yorkers everywhere died at 94 last week.

Les Waas, a Philadelphia native, wrote the Mister Softee ice cream jingle 56 years ago, originally for a radio commercial, according to the Mister Softee Facebook page.

Since then, the tune has been heard in the periphery of parks all over the city, fading in and out as the ice cream trucks travel through neighborhood streets during the summer.

"The song has since become one of the most recognized commercial jingles in America," a Mister Softee Facebook post reads.

A video of the jingle posted on YouTube, offering an "extended" version of the tune, was viewed nearly 900,000 times.

For those who didn't know, the instrumental jingle we've all heard comes with lyrics, which is available for download on Mister Softee's website:

"The creamiest, dreamiest soft ice cream,
You get from Mister Softee.
For a refreshing delight supreme,
Look for Mister Softee.
My milkshakes and my sundaes and my cones are such a treat,
Listen for my store on wheels, ding-a-ling down the street.
The creamiest, dreamiest soft ice cream,
You get from Mister Softee.
For a refreshing delight supreme,
Look for Mister Softee.
S-O-F-T dubble 'E', Mister Softee!"

"Musician/songwriters come in every flavor. Thanks Les for making my childhood a musical one...keep driving," said Facebook user Robin DiBruce. 

"The jingle written by Mr. Waas was an important part in the success of our company," James Conway, VP of Mr. Softee, told DNAinfo.

Waas died on April 19, according to Broadcast Pioneers, a nonprofit that counted Waas as one of its members. 

He lived in Huntingdon Valley, P.A. He leaves behind his two children and three grandchildren.

Fun fact: Waas was also the president of the "Procrastinators Club of America."