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De Blasio Proposed Tax Hikes 'Unfair' to Wealthy, Bloomberg Says

By Colby Hamilton | November 22, 2013 11:26am
 Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned that taxes could drive New York City's wealthy elsewhere during his weekly radio WOR appearance on Friday, November 22, 2013.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned that taxes could drive New York City's wealthy elsewhere during his weekly radio WOR appearance on Friday, November 22, 2013.
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Courtesy of the Mayor's office

CIVIC CENTER — Mayor Michael Bloomberg fears the risk Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio's proposed higher taxes could have on the city's future, he told listeners on his weekly radio address Friday.

The Mayor said plans to tax the wealthy was “unfair” and could lead to a departure of the city’s financial heavy hitters — by sending “a message to them that down the road it's going to be a lot worse.”

“Every city would love to have the wealthy people that we have because they pay the bills,” Bloomberg said on WOR’s John Gambling show.

Bloomberg has been openly dismissive of de Blasio over his liberal economic agenda, which includes raising taxes to pay for universal prekindergarten. He said that tactics that stop NYC from being competitive and attractive economically would drive the rich out.

“Places like London are going to eat our lunch,” Bloomberg said.

Bloomberg said it's up to Governor Andrew Cuomo to guard against “the pressure to increase New York City taxes for big raises” for the unions, according to Bloomberg.

Not that the billionaire mayor is himself an anti-tax kind of guy.

“I have a big smile on my face when I pay my taxes,” said Bloomberg, who reiterated he plans to live in New York City for the rest of his life. “You get a lot for it.”

The mayor also reflected on the recent election, saying this year’s message was less anti-establishment or anti-Bloomberg and more about a change of scenery at City Hall.

He likened the public sentiment that swept Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio into office with 73 percent of the vote to seasonal fashion preferences for different hemline lengths.

“Next year, they move them up or down —people just want a change,” Bloomberg said.