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Help Name Governors Island's Composting Baby Goats

By Irene Plagianos on June 5, 2014 3:21pm 

 Governors Island needs helps naming these two baby goats, who'll live on the Island's composting center through the season.
Governors Island needs helps naming these two baby goats, who'll live on the Island's composting center through the season.
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Twitter/Earth Matters

GOVERNORS ISLAND — A pair of cute kids living on Governors Island this summer need some help — with their names.

The Trust for Governors Island is asking for name suggestions for a couple of adorable, female baby goats that will spend the season at the island’s composting center, munching on visitors’ discarded food scraps.

Tweet name ideas to @Gov_Island by June 11, and a winner will be chosen by the end of that day, the Trust said.

So far, suggestions for the 4-week-old goats — a dark brown Nubian and a white Alpine-Saanen mix — include Ebony and Ivory, from @TheGitch, as well as Sansa and Arya, a pair of sisters from the show “Game of Thrones,” and Hop and Scotch.

Check below for some of our readers' favorites, and tweet us more at @DNAinfo

Both goats are on loan from Long Island's Goodale Farms. Last year, the season’s goats, from the same farm, were named Patches and Cream.

The goats will join two bunnies, 15 chicks, 40 chickens, worms and bees at the Earth Matter Composting Learning Center, said Marisa DeDominicis, the center’s director.

This is the third year the center is housing goats, which like to chow down stray branches, leaves and weeds — which helps the Trust maintain the grounds — along with leftover food.

The young goats are still being fed with milk bottles, but they have already starting chomping on food scraps and greenery as well, DeDominicis said.

Visitors to the center, which is located just off the newly opened Play Lawn, can pet and help feed the goats every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

“The goats are a great way to bring attention to the importance of composting,” said DeDominicis. “Food scraps are a resource, not garbage.”

DeDominicis said there are 15 brown cans throughout the island labeled for composting, which are collected for the goats.

After the season, the yet-unnamed goats will head back to the farm, where they’ll be used as dairy goats, for education about farming — and for visitors to pet.

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