Park Ave. Armory Photo Show Features Rare Images from Around the World

By Lindsay Armstrong on April 10, 2014 3:38pm 

 This untitled photograph by Japanese photographer Akira Sato is one of the rare images on display at the show. Vintage silver gelatin print, 11 x 14 inches.
This untitled photograph by Japanese photographer Akira Sato is one of the rare images on display at the show. Vintage silver gelatin print, 11 x 14 inches.
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© Estate of Akira Sato. Courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

UPPER EAST SIDE — Images of Hiroshima 20 years after the atomic bomb was dropped; pictures that capture day and night at some of New York’s most iconic locations in a single image; previously unseen photographs from the Civil Rights March in Selma, Alabama: all of these are on display through Sunday at the Park Avenue Armory.

The 34th edition of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers Show runs from April 10 to 13. More than 80 galleries are exhibiting works at the show, including contemporary, modern and 19th century photographs.

Some of the photographs on display include images from two new and highly touted photography books. Richard Renaldi, the photographer behind the new book "Touching Strangers," will display some of his works from the series in which he approached two strangers on the street and asked them to pose in an intimate embrace. The works will be on exhibit at the Bonni Benrubi Gallery display.

Photographs from Jen Davis — who gained attention in 2012 for her series of self-portraits exploring her life as an obese young woman and later adjusting to her new self image as she lost weight — will also be on display. Prints from her resulting book "Jen Davis: Eleven Years" will be on display at the Lee Marks Fine Art stand.

Other highlights include a rare photo sculpture entitled "Fractured Figure Sections/Beach" a tower of images that rotate on a central axis — by famed artist and photographer Robert Heinecken, as well as images from Stephen Wilkes' "Day to Night" collection. Wilkes took thousands of photographs of an iconic location over the course of a single day and then blended up to 50 of the pictures together to create a surreal image of the landscape that captures day and night in one picture. He has photographed Central Park, Times Square, the Flatiron Building and Coney Island, among other New York City locations for the project.

In addition to the wide variety of photographs on display, the show will also host four panel discussions on Saturday. They will touch on topics including LGBTQ photography and how museums curate their photography exhibits.

Filmmaker Cheryl Dunn will also screen her latest documentary, "Everybody Street," a look at some of New York City’s most iconic street photographers. A Q&A with the director and several of the photographers featured in the film will be held after the screening.

Admission to the show is $30 for one day or $50 for a four-day pass.

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