Luke's Lobster Opening Park Slope Location

By Leslie Albrecht on February 13, 2014 10:26am 

 Luke's Lobster, which sells lobster rolls as well as crab and shrimp rolls, is opening a location in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue and Carroll Street.
Luke's Lobster, which sells lobster rolls as well as crab and shrimp rolls, is opening a location in Park Slope on Fifth Avenue and Carroll Street.
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Facebook/Luke's Lobster

PARK SLOPE — Break out the hot buttered rolls, Luke's Lobster is opening in Park Slope.

The lobster roll mini chain, which prides itself on serving "pure" lobster with no filler nestled in a toasted bun, will be moving into 237 Fifth Ave., at Carroll Street, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported.

The restaurant will open sometime this spring, after a renovation on the space, Luke's Lobster vice president Ben Coniff told the Daily Eagle.

Coniff, who lives in Park Slope, told the newspaper that Park Slope was a natural fit for Luke's Lobster because "the neighborhood has the same commitment to traceability, sustainability and pure quality that we have in our menu."

Luke's Lobster harvests all of its crustacean meat from "Maine's sustainable waters and not from exhausted, polluted fisheries," according to the company's website.

The restaurant launched in the East Village in 2009 and now has eight outposts, including locations in Washington, D.C. and Bethesda, Md. There's also a mobile food truck that sells Luke's food in Manhattan.

The menu is simple: there are lobster rolls ($15) as well as crab and shrimp rolls, served with chips and soda. Luke's Lobster also serves Maine favorites such as clam chowder, and in the winter it offers a lobster grilled cheese with gruyere for $12.

Word first spread that Luke's Lobster was coming to the neighborhood back in September 2013, when a representative for the company told Here's Park Slope that the company was eyeing Park Slope locations but hadn't picked one yet.

The space that Luke's Lobster will take over has been boarded up for several years. It was last occupied by Joe's Shoe Repair, a longtime neighborhood business that was almost forced to leave in 2008 but was "saved" when the nonprofit Fifth Avenue Committee bought the building, the Daily News reported.

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