Former P.S. 321 Flea Market Vendors Move South to Greenwood Heights

By Leslie Albrecht on October 23, 2013 4:41pm 

 A vendor at the former flea market outside P.S. 321 in Park Slope. After the space was taken over by Brooklyn Flea, many of the old vendors moved to a new spot on Fourth Avenue and 20th Street.
A vendor at the former flea market outside P.S. 321 in Park Slope. After the space was taken over by Brooklyn Flea, many of the old vendors moved to a new spot on Fourth Avenue and 20th Street.
View Full Caption
Flickr/ChrisGoldNY

GREENWOOD HEIGHTS — The creepy doll heads have found a new home.

Former vendors from the flea market outside P.S. 321 have moved to a new location on Fourth Avenue and 20th Street, where they'll be selling the same oddball collection of "hipster ephemera" and attic treasures, said market manager Paul, who declined to give his last name.

"We hope all of our friends in the Slope will come down and say, 'hello,'" Paul said. "They can still find a vintage dress for $10 and nice coat for $20."

The merchandise line-up will offer much of the same "empire of bric-a-brac" — such as art pieces made from plastic doll parts — that drew customers to the market outside P.S. 321 on Seventh Avenue and First Street.

After 30 years in business, that market lost its spot when it was outbid by Brooklyn Flea, the successful operator of well-known outdoor bazaars in Fort Greene and Williamsburg.

Brooklyn Flea, which took over the space on Oct. 12, has said it wants to honor the tradition of the "fabled" neighborhood market while also showcasing antique vendors from its other locations. The price for renting a vending space at the new market is $100 a day, a big hike from the $40 fee that vendors paid at the old market.

Some of the old vendors have stayed on a the Seventh Avenue location, but many others have moved to a parking lot on Fourth Avenue and 20th Street.

The market will be open year-round on weekends from 9 a.m. to sundown, only closing "if it's pouring," said April Summars of Brooklyn Trading Co., which operates the new market.

“It's a nice open space and it gives us the opportunity to really grow," Summars said. "It will be the same sort of market, where there's a wide variety of things to buy and look at: antiques, vintage, collectibles. There are some oddities you can't find in other places."

Highlights include vinyl records, vintage stamps and salt and pepper shakers, and antique crystal harvested from old chandeliers, Summars said. And Sal, the man who sells the doll part pieces, will be in attendance as well.

"They’re really creepy and spooky looking, but for something so creepy, it’s really cool," Summars said.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement