Queens Parent Groups Blast 'Troubling' Tougher State Tests

By Katie Honan on August 15, 2013 2:17pm 

 From left to right, New York City Chief Academic Officer Shael Polakow-Suransky, NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott, State Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch, State Education Commissioner John King, Jr., and Mayor Michael Bloomberg announce the results of the latest 3rd-8th grade test scores at the Tweed Courthouse in New York City on August 7, 2013.
From left to right, New York City Chief Academic Officer Shael Polakow-Suransky, NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott, State Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch, State Education Commissioner John King, Jr., and Mayor Michael Bloomberg announce the results of the latest 3rd-8th grade test scores at the Tweed Courthouse in New York City on August 7, 2013.
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Flikr/Courtesy of the Mayors office

QUEENS — The community education council for East Elmhurst and Jackson Heights blasted the latest state test results, saying they don't properly measure the abilities of students and teachers. 

The statement released by CEC 30, which covers other parts of Queens as well, urged parents to "use caution" in reviewing the test results, which were released last week.

Results for individual students will be released at the end of the month. More than half of the city's students failed the tests, which were harder, some say unfairly, to accommodate the new Common Core curriculum.

In District 30, the majority of students from the third through eighth grades scored a level 2 in math and english, in line with results from around the city. Level 3 is considered proficiency.

"Both the tests and way that they were scored are very troubling," the council said.

“Simply put, the state's new scoring system ensured a lower ‘proficiency’ rate regardless of the performance of the students."

Jeffrey Guyton, co-president of the council, questioned why the test measured proficiency in Common Core when it hasn’t been integrated into the curriculum yet.

“If we knew so many kids were going to fail, why did we do it?” he asked.

“To raise the bar and shorten time is deeply unfair. These kids don’t have enough time to finish the test.”

CEC 30 is holding a business meeting on Thursday at the Queens Integrated Service Center, 28-11 Queens Plaza North, 5th floor conference room in Long Island City. 

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