Bronx Sees Biggest Influx of Chain Stores Amid Citywide Rise, Report Shows

By Andrea Swalec on December 18, 2012 7:40am 

 Dunkin' Donuts was the largest chain in New York in 2012, with 484 locations across the five boroughs.
Dunkin' Donuts was the largest chain in New York in 2012, with 484 locations across the five boroughs.
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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

NEW YORK CITY — Look out, mom and pop.

The growth of chain stores in New York City accelerated in 2012, from a 1.8 percent increase in the number of national retailers in 2011 to a 2.4 percent increase this year, according to a report released Monday by public policy nonprofit the Center for an Urban Future.

National retailers now have 7,190 stores citywide, according to the 2012 "State of the Chains" report, up from 7,019 stores last year.

Starbucks may be king in Manhattan — with 201 locations in the borough, more than any other chain — but Dunkin' Donuts and Subway rule citywide. The doughnut chain boasts 484 locations, the most of any national retailer in the city. Subway trails not far behind, with 454 locations.

The Bronx saw the largest percentage increase in the number of chain retail stores, at 4.3 percent, with 809 locations last year compared to 844 locations this year.

Retailers with big growth over the past year include 7-Eleven, which expanded from 83 to 98 locations; GNC, which grew from 131 to 143 locations; and T-Mobile, which increased from 161 to 174 locations, the report found.

With the exception of Staten Island, every borough saw a rise in the number of chain stores. Staten Island had a 0.7 percent decrease in chains.

Individual neighborhoods with the most significant increases in national retailers were East New York, Brownsville, Kew Gardens and Mott Haven, according to the report.

The areas with the most national retailers this year were New Springville on Staten Island, with 184; the Garment District and Koreatown in Manhattan, with 180; and the East Village in Manhattan, with 179, the report said.

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