Dirty Trucks Turn 'Quiet' Woodside Street in Traffic-Jammed Highway

By Ewa Kern-Jedrychowska on July 23, 2012 5:37pm 

On July 23rd, Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer and Congressman Joe Crowley joined community leaders and local residents to call on officials to enforce the “No Truck Route” along 65th Place in Woodside.
On July 23rd, Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer and Congressman Joe Crowley joined community leaders and local residents to call on officials to enforce the “No Truck Route” along 65th Place in Woodside.
View Full Caption
COUNCIL MEMBER JIMMY VAN BRAMER'S OFFICE

QUEENS — Woodside’s 65th Place — a once quiet residential street with many single family homes — has become a highway for trucks that is choked with congestion, noise and air pollution, residents and elected officials said Monday.

Some residents, who asked for a crackdown on the truck traffic, also said that their homes have suffered from structural damage caused by the vibrations.

“These trucks that are barreling through this quiet residential neighborhood are not only utilizing this route illegally but they are also presenting a serious hazard to the quality of air for the people of Woodside,” said City Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer.

Currently, 65th Place is not a truck route, which means that trucks can't travel on it "unless they are making local deliveries."

But the street lacks the necessary signage, officials noted.

Van Bramer said that earlier this year, he contacted the DOT requesting that signs be installed along 65th Place between Queens Boulevard and Maurice Avenue.

“Enforcement must be upheld in order to put an end to this issue and the Department of Transportation can help us address this immediately by installing the proper signage to deter trucks from coming through this quiet neighborhood,” Van Bramer added.

The councilman said he had also requested that the 108th Precinct increase traffic enforcement along 65th Place "to ensure truck traffic and noise pollution is directed away from local streets."

Congressman Joseph Crowley also called for the DOT to install signage that makes it clear that trucks are not allowed on this street. "We must take every step possible to make our community an even better place to live,” he said, asking for an increased enforcement.

A DOT spokesman said Monday that the department "will inspect the area and see if any sign enhancements or other enhancements are needed."

Neighborhood Sponsors

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement