Ultra-Orthodox Jews Rally Against Internet Dangers at Citi Field

By Alan Neuhauser on May 21, 2012 10:50am 

Ultra-Orthodox Jews gather before entering Citi Field for a meeting to discuss the risks of using the Internet on May 20, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. More than 40,000 were expected to attend the rally at Citi Field, the home of the New York Mets, which organizers said would promote religiously responsible ways to use the Internet.
Ultra-Orthodox Jews gather before entering Citi Field for a meeting to discuss the risks of using the Internet on May 20, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. More than 40,000 were expected to attend the rally at Citi Field, the home of the New York Mets, which organizers said would promote religiously responsible ways to use the Internet.
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QUEENS — Tens of thousands of Orthodox Jewish men packed the seats at Citi Field and Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing Sunday evening to rally against what they call the encroaching dangers of the Internet.

Organized by the rabbinical group Ichud Hakehillos L'tochar Hamachane, the demonstration did not call for a total ban on Internet use, according to the Daily News.

Instead, it reportedly sought to encourage more careful use of the Web, arguing that sites such as Facebook and Twitter could lead to child abuse, adultery or pornography, the New York Times said.

"With one click, all of a sudden, you lose control and are whisked away to a world you never intended to see, and it overtakes your life," Ichud Hakelhilios spokesman Eytan Kobre told the News. "As a community, we are asking, is it worth it?"

More than 120 buses ferried men to the event from Williamsburg.

Women were not allowed to attend. Instead, they watched live video feeds at locations in Williamsburg and other neighborhoods around the city, NBC New York reported.

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