Quantcast

Human-Poop Dumpers Menace Brooklyn Block

By Leslie Albrecht | September 22, 2015 3:58pm
 Someone has been dumping piles of human waste on 17th Street near Sixth Avenue.
Human Poop Dumper Terrorizing Brooklyn Block
View Full Caption

GREENWOOD HEIGHTS — What a waste.

Neighbors on 17th Street and Sixth Avenue say their block is a dumping ground for feces and urine and the problem is getting worse.

Someone has been leaving piles of poop, pee, paper towels and feminine hygiene products on the block sporadically for the past four years, and in the past four months there's been an onslaught of 15 disgusting dumpings, said local resident Barbara Eidinger.

Late Sunday night, the mystery dumper left a foul stew of poop and pee at the base of three sycamore trees along the north side of 17th Street overlooking the Prospect Expressway.

"The block smelled like a pissoir on Monday morning," said Eidinger, a retiree who spends her free time tidying up the block, where she's lived for 64 years.

Eidinger described how she uses OxiClean and water to cut the stench from the rivulets of urine that sometimes trickle down sloping 17th Street.

Twice locals have found kitchen-sized plastic garbage bins full of the filthy swill sitting out on the street. Some of the dumping has happened inside a small park on the block where a group of preschool age children were playing Tuesday morning.

A Department of Sanitation spokeswoman said garbage haulers removed a five-gallon bucket full of what appeared to be human feces from the block earlier this summer.

Eidinger posts signs and caution tape every time she finds one of the poopy piles to warn dog walkers and pedestrians with kids. The block is well-traveled by families on their way to nearby P.S. 295, M.S. 88 and P.S. 10.

She and other neighbors suspect a couple who lives on the block is responsible for the revolting refuse, and they've asked the 72nd Precinct to investigate. An NYPD spokeswoman did not have further details.

"It's kind of demoralizing when you have this kind of mess to clean up," Eidinger said.