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Royal Wedding Cookies Devoured at Chelsea Market Shop

By DNAinfo Staff on April 26, 2011 5:45pm  | Updated on April 26, 2011 5:44pm

By Elizabeth Ladzinski

DNAinfo Reporter/Producer


CHELSEA — Manhattanites and tourists have been gobbling up all they can about the royal wedding — literally.

Dessert shop Eleni's in Chelsea Market — which recently offered cookies decorated with the faces of Oscar nominees — is now selling royal wedding cookie boxed sets inspired by Prince William and Kate Middleton as well as individual cookies decorated to look like royal china plates.

Workers said the cookies have been flying off the shelves since they began stocking them two weeks ago, routinely selling out before the day is over. They've even taken orders from as far away as Texas and Louisiana.

"We keep having to boost how many we're making by the moment," said Annie Gerson, marketing manager for the company. "We didnt expect it to grow this fast."

A 16-cookie boxed set — which includes biscuts shaped like Big Ben, an engagement ring, a horse and carriage as well as the famous bride and groom — goes for $68.50. Alternatively, individual cookies decorated to look like small ($8.50) and large ($12) royal wedding China plates are also for sale. The sugar cookies are covered in a vanilla flavored — what else? — royal icing.

Deirdre Withers, 39, came into the city with her sister, mother and daughter from upstate New York to buy the cookies for her family's royal wedding viewing party on Friday.

"We're gonna get up at 4 a.m. and watch the festivities together," Withers said, after buying the last two royal wedding cookies available in the shop at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday.

Withers added that they planned to eat fish and chips the night before and drink English tea Firday morning in the spirit of the wedding.

Employees at Eleni's encourage customers to place their orders soon, as there's already a waitlist for the cookies. But the shop, as well as the second location on Madison Avenue, will continue to get new shipments of the cookies from their Long Island production facility through Friday.

"I was gonna call ahead but then I thought 'How many people could be buying them?'" Withers said, after realizing how few of the cookies were left in the shop.

"Apparently a lot!" she added.