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Residents Call For Delancey Street Bike Lane After Cyclist Struck and Killed By Bus

By DNAinfo Staff on January 12, 2010 7:59am  | Updated on January 12, 2010 8:00am

A female cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus on Delancey Street near Ludlow Street on Jan. 5, 2010.
A female cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus on Delancey Street near Ludlow Street on Jan. 5, 2010.
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CSMunsy/Flickr

By Suzanne Ma

DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

LOWER EAST SIDE — Flowers and candles have been left at the curbside where a woman was struck and killed by a school bus last week while riding her bicycle on Delancey Street.

Blocks from the Williamsburg Bridge, Delancey Street is a popular route for cyclists heading to and from Brooklyn, according to Transportation Alternatives. But advocates and residents say the city has failed to protect riders on the busy stretch.

"Just look at these people driving," said Carol Kent, a Lower East Side resident and store owner who passed by the memorial Monday afternoon. "They are crazy."

Kent said she did not witness the crash, but arrived at the scene shortly afterward to see the victim, who was identified by police as 74-year-old Fuen Bai of the East Village, lying on the pavement.

A woman cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus on Delancey Street near Ludlow on January 5, 2010.
A woman cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus on Delancey Street near Ludlow on January 5, 2010.
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CSMunsy/Flickr

"Terrible, terrible. My daughter still has nightmares about it," she said. "They should fix the street."

The city's Department of Transportation says they have worked hard to expand the network of bicycle lanes across the city, including bike paths leading to and from the Williamsburg Bridge.

The paths run on Clinton Street, connecting to the Grand Street bicycle lanes, said spokesman Monty Dean. The DOT has also built new ramps at the bridge that provide separate lanes for bikes and pedestrians, Dean told DNAinfo.

But residents and advocates said the DOT should look at improving conditions on Delancey Street.

Last Tuesday, Bai reportedly hit a pothole and fell behind the bus, which then backed over her. Police have not pressed charges.

Over the weekend, a passerby left a note at the memorial.

"Though we never met, I mourn your passing. My heart broke at the news of the tragic loss of your life on this street," the cyclist wrote.

"I too ride daily these dangerous streets, and had we met, would surely have had many stories to tell. I hope to see you in heaven and maybe share a ride with you there. I am sure the streets are in much better condition."

Caroline Samponaro, director of bicycle advocacy at Transportation Alternatives, said the group has advocated for Delancey Street bike lanes since 2008.

Flowers are and candles have been left with the victim's bicycle, which has been chained to a signpost on Delancey Street near Ludlow.
Flowers are and candles have been left with the victim's bicycle, which has been chained to a signpost on Delancey Street near Ludlow.
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Suzanne Ma/DNAinfo

"No one should have to risk their lives," Samponaro told DNAinfo. "Crossing Delancey becomes a real feat. We should really be thinking about a way to create better infrastructure for cyclists in what is a major thoroughfare."