F Train Had Most Delays Among Subway Lines in 2013, Report Says

By Ben Fractenberg on May 6, 2014 4:13pm 

 The F was the line most prone to delays in 2013, according to a new report by the Straphangers Campaign.
The F was the line most prone to delays in 2013, according to a new report by the Straphangers Campaign.
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DNAinfo/Michael Ip

QUEENS — The F train was the subway line most prone to delays in 2013, according to a new report by the Straphangers Campaign.

There were 326 real-time incident alerts sent to riders via text message or email for the F train last year, 28 more than the second-place 4 train, according to the report.

The study used alerts warning of service delays of at least 8 minutes sent to more than 90,000 riders. The group said it did not count delays out of the MTA’s control, like a sick passenger or police activity.

The overall number of MTA incident alerts sent to riders also increased 35 percent — to 3,998 from 2,967  — from 2011 to 2013, according to the Straphangers Campaign.

“The increase in alerts is a troubling sign that subway service is deteriorating,” Gene Russianoff, staff attorney for Straphangers Campaign, said in a statement.

Adding to strains on the system is an increase in ridership, which is at its highest point since the late 1940s, Russianoff told DNAinfo New York.

He added that there could still be some residual problems caused by Hurricane Sandy — which is why the group compared 2013 with 2011 and not 2012 — but that the majority of delays were still most likely caused by issues like overcrowding and train maintenance.

The line with the fewest delays was the J/Z, with only 53 last year, five fewer than it had in 2011, according to Straphangers Campaign.

It was the only line to see a reduction in 2013, the group added.

The campaign was not able to analyze the average length of delays since the MTA does not report on the duration of the alerts, the group said.

The MTA cautioned that the group's statistics can be misleading.

"We agree that the service alerts are a powerful tool that deliver meaningful information to customers," MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz said in a statement. "However, the cause of such incidents can quickly change upon further investigation, which is why the alerts were never meant to serve as a performance metric."

Ortiz said the MTA assesment, which includes both controllable and non-controllable incidents, is far more accurate and that the agency is doing all it can to alleviate headaches for straphangers.

Based on that data, Ortiz said, "the amount of time customers have had to wait for a train throughout the system has remained flat.”

See how your line fared here.

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