Ray Kelly Jabs Unions Over Use of $30 Million In Disciplinary Cash

By Murray Weiss on March 12, 2013 5:38pm | Updated on March 12, 2013 8:00pm

 Police Commissioner Ray Kelly shared details about the police-involved shooting following a City Council budget hearing on March 12, 2013.
Police Commissioner Ray Kelly shared details about the police-involved shooting following a City Council budget hearing on March 12, 2013.
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DNAinfo/Jill Colvin

NEW YORK CITY — Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly fired back at the city’s cop unions that claim he has stiffed their pension fund out of $30 million.

Following an appearance at a City Council budget hearing Tuesday, Kelly stiffened when he was asked about a DNAinfo.com New York report that the unions filed a notice of claim questioning why that the NYPD withheld millions in salary from disciplined cops instead of funneling the cash into pension funds.

"I suggest that they talk to the actuary of New York City,” Kelly tersely replied. “The provision where that money was supposed to go to the pension fund was eliminated in 1995."

Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, told “On The Inside” that he filed the claim on behalf of the city's cops because the city’s administrative code indicates the money from nearly 18,000 disciplined cops a year should be going to their pension funds. 

He said he could not get proof of any change or amendment to that code so he filed the claim.

Mullins acknowledge that there was a 1995 amendment, but its wording “does not alleviate the city’s responsibility for funding the pension with the monies that retain from disciplinary actions.”

Mullins said the “interpretation of this law” is up in the air.

“Our reading of that amendment does not alleviate the forfeiture monies are supposed to go to the pension funds,” he insisted.

“That is up for debate,” he added. “I am sure we will come up with a conclusion.

“So far no one is satisfying the questions where the money should go.”

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