Sanitation Department Extends Debris Collection in Areas Affected by Sandy

By Paul DeBenedetto on February 19, 2013 4:45pm 

 A resident of Rockaway Park cleans out his flood damaged home on Nov. 5, 2012. The Department of Sanitation on Feb. 19 said they would extend their debris collection plan until further notice.
A resident of Rockaway Park cleans out his flood damaged home on Nov. 5, 2012. The Department of Sanitation on Feb. 19 said they would extend their debris collection plan until further notice.
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DNAinfo/Michael Ip

NEW YORK CITY — Debris cleanup in the areas hardest-hit by Hurricane Sandy will continue, despite passing the latest deadline set by the city, officials said Tuesday.

Under the Department of Sanitation's special storm debris collection plan, families whose homes were struck by the massive storm last year can leave out debris from the cleanup process one day before their normal garbage pickup.

Sanitation officials originally planned to end debris collections on Dec. 31, but extended that date until Jan. 14, then again until Feb. 18.

Now, the collection has again been extended indefinitely.

"We lost a couple of days to snow preperation and actual snow fighting, as well as recent holidays," said department spokeswoman Kathy Dawkins"So the Superstorm Sandy cleanup will continue until further notice."

A spokesman from Rockaway Councilman Eric Ulrich's office said they had also sent a letter to the Sanitation Department asking for an extension after seeing so many homes with remaining debris.

Many home repairs were late to start because people were waiting for money from their insurance companies, said Danny Ruscillo, the president of the 100th precinct community council which represents the Rockaways.

Because of this, there's more and more debris being cleaned out daily, he said.

"There was a lot of stuff out. You couldn't hold [the deadline] to the 18th," Ruscillo said. "You can't rip it out if you don't have anything to put back in the home."

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