Bedford Baking Studio to Offer Pastry Recipes Straight From Turkish Farm

By Meredith Hoffman on June 5, 2012 1:47pm | Updated on June 5, 2012 2:23pm

Tolga Eyidemir (left) is opening Bedford Baking Studio later this month, with help from his friend head barista Zachary Zierden (right).
Tolga Eyidemir (left) is opening Bedford Baking Studio later this month, with help from his friend head barista Zachary Zierden (right).
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DNAinfo/Meredith Hoffman

WILLIAMSBURG — Scents from the cheesy, flaky pastries of a Turkish farm are soon to waft up South Bedford Avenue, when Bedford Baking Studio opens later this month with an in-house kitchen and fresh coffee.

"My grandma's already sent me recipes," said Tolga Eyidemir, 29, who began baking at age 7 beside his grandmother in East Turkey and is now opening up his cafe on 347 Bedford Ave. "She would kick me out of the kitchen with a broom to play soccer with my brother...but eventually she gave up."

Eyidemir will offer boreks — Turkish puff pastries with feta, cured meat or spinach — walnut-filled muffins, franzipan tarts, macaroons, quiches, and custard items in his intimate pink-painted shop. 

He'll caffeinate customers with fair trade brews from the Brooklyn-based Crop to Cup and Turkish coffee, and plans eventually to serve sandwiches and more elaborate meals in the newly renovated space.

"There will be constantly changing options and chances to work on a new idea," said Eyidemir, emphasizing that he'd offer a variety of cuisines including French and Italian. "That's why I'm calling it a 'studio.'"

Eyidemir, who has studied at the International Culinary Institute and worked at restaurants in Europe and New York, said the experiment — which includes "baking residencies" available for local cooks to use the space and sell their products there — is the ideal chance to explore his passion for food.

"My grandmother put a lot of soul in her food," said Eyidemir, who recalled sitting with her and her friends as they gossiped and prepared boreks each day. "Food requires an interaction with guests."

Eyidemir said his spot, which will have seating for 10 to 12 people on a couch and communal table, will be open 7 a.m. until 8 p.m., starting in about three weeks.

"It's a modern interpretation of a traditional grandma house," he said.

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