From the Doorman to the Nanny, DNAinfo's Holiday Tip Guide Has You Covered

By Jon Schuppe on December 14, 2011 7:20am 

Doormen are among dozens of service providers on many New Yorkers' holiday-tipping lists.
Doormen are among dozens of service providers on many New Yorkers' holiday-tipping lists.
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Getty Images/Spencer Platt

MANHATTAN — Tipping is already a stressful holiday-season duty for busy New Yorkers.

And with doormen, supers, nannies, nurses, cleaners, personal trainers, newspaper deliverers, dog walkers, parking attendants — the list seems endless — to take care of, the task can seem even more fraught and budget-busting.

So DNAinfo compiled a list, culled from experts including The Emily Post Institute and The Etiquette School of New York, of who to tip and how much to give them.

These recommendations are meant as a guide. Tips can be adjusted according to how close you are with a particular person and how good a job they’ve done. If you can’t afford cash, a personal note of thanks is fine, the experts say.

Building superintendent: anywhere from $20 to $200. As with other building workers, if you've lived there just a part of the year, prorate your tip.

Doorman: $15 to $100

Elevator operator: $15 to $40

House cleaner: Cash in the amount of one visit.

Live-in housekeeper/nanny/cook: One week to one month of their wage and a gift.

Babysitter: One evening’s pay and a small gift.

Day care provider: $25 to $75 and a small gift from your child.

Nurse or home-health worker: A gift.

Barber or hairdresser: Cash in the amount of one visit, or a gift.

Personal trainer: Cash in the amount of one session, or a gift.

Dog walker: Their usual week's pay, or a gift.

Parking garage attendants: $10 to $30, or a small gift.

Newspaper delivery person: $10 to $30 or a small gift.

Mail carrier: The U.S. Postal Service has rules for what carriers may accept. Cash and gift cards are not permitted. Snacks, small gifts with little intrinsic value and worth less than $20 are allowed.

Teachers: A small gift or note from you and a small gift from your child.

"The first rule of tipping is to tip only what you can afford to tip,” Peter Post, great-grandson of Emily Post and director of the Emily Post Institute, has told the New York Times.

Then make a list of all the people you want to thank for their help this year. Most of those people probably deserve cash. But in many instances — including teachers and babysitters — it is acceptable to give a card with a nice note or, if you’re crafty, something handmade.

Tipping for the holudays doesn't have to be overwhelming.
Tipping for the holudays doesn't have to be overwhelming.
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DNAinfo/Jill Colvin

“Most people are grateful for whatever they receive,” Etiquette School of New York Director Patricia Napier-Fitzpatrick wrote on her website.

No matter what you decide, remember that it is scientifically proven that giving actually makes you healthier.

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