Magnolia Bakery To Sweeten Bloomingdale's

By Amy Zimmer on April 28, 2011 5:27pm | Updated on April 29, 2011 5:58am

By Amy Zimmer

DNAinfo News Editor

MANHATTAN — The famous buttery cupcakes of Magnolia Bakery are coming to Bloomingdale's flagship store this summer.

The shopping Mecca and the hand-made dessert juggernaut that helped launch a nationwide cupcake movement announced their official partnership on Thursday.

The new Magnolia will be on the street level, accessible through Bloomingdale's mid-block entrance on Third Avenue between 59th and 60th streets, and open from 7:30 a.m. until 10 p.m. every day, selling its signature cupcakes and muffins, pies, cakes, cookies, pudding, coffee and tea.

"The partnership is a perfect match of two brands that are completely in-sync with their values," Steve Abrams, co-owner of Magnolia Bakery, said in a statement.

It will be Magnolia's fifth New York shop.

The store, founded in 1996 and became a household name after being featured on "Sex and the City," has also opened branches in Los Angeles and at the Bloomingdale's in Dubai.

The bakery, however, will have some competition from a new kid in town.

Sprinkles, the Beverly Hills-based shop with a devoted following of Hollywood stars including Katie Holmes and Oprah Winfrey — and touts itself as the world's first cupcake-only bakery — is opening half a block from Bloomie's on May 13.

Both bakeries are known to attract long lines and have been the subject of hype and haters.

One person, posting a Yelp review for Magnolia's, wrote, "Old-fashioned cupcakes and bread pudding make me smile. It's worth nudging through tourists and waiting in line for a 1500 calorie treat."

Another, who wrote they were overpriced, too sweet and messy, said, "I would never recommend. I don't care how famous, or how much someone likes SATC."

"Damnnnnnnnn. Those are some good cupcakes!," one person wrote about Sprinkles.

"This place is laughably overrated," another wrote.

Both bakeries have a litigious history. After Sprinkles' trademarked its "modern dot," it filed several lawsuits against dot-using competitors, and Magnolia sued one of its founders after she opened an unauthorized branch in Greece, according to reports.

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