White House Cuts Anti-Terrorism Funding Days After Times Square Bomb Plot

By Ben Fractenberg on May 13, 2010 7:18am | Updated on May 13, 2010 7:14am

An NYPD counterterrorism officer watches commuters entering the subway at Grand Central on Monday, March 29, 2010. The Department of Homeland Security announced cuts to New York's anti-terror funding in May.
An NYPD counterterrorism officer watches commuters entering the subway at Grand Central on Monday, March 29, 2010. The Department of Homeland Security announced cuts to New York's anti-terror funding in May.
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AP Photo/Kathy Willens

By Ben Fractenberg

DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

MANHATTAN — The White House will slash more than $50 million in anti-terror funding from New York City, days after a bomb plot was foiled in Times Square.

The Department of Homeland Security told local officials Wednesday that mass transit security funds would be cut by 27 percent, and port security money would be reduced by 25 percent, the New York Post reported.

That means $42 million less for transit security — last year the city got $153 million in funding and this year is getting $111 million.

"For the administration to announce these cuts two weeks after the attempted Times Square bombing shows they just don’t get it and are not doing right by New York City on anti-terrorism funding," Sen. Chuck Schumer told the Post. "Instead of distributing funding all over the country, they should focus their attention where the greatest threat exists — right here in New York."

Meanwhile, President Barack Obama was due in Manhattan Thursday for a Democratic Party fundraiser at the St. Regis Hotel.

Homeland Security officials forecast the cuts back in December, the Daily News reported. But local officials figured the reductions would be scrapped in the wake of the Times Square plot.

The cut announcement comes also on the heels of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's visit to London to inspect their "Ring of Steel" security camera system.

When asked about the cuts by CBS 2 News, Bloomberg said he hadn't seen them and wouldn't comment.

A Homeland Security spokesman told the News that the federal government was not shortchanging the city and was "actively engaged in supporting New York City's first responders and overall preparedness."

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