Goat's Head Delivered To Wrigley Field Is 'Intimidating Package:' Cops

By Kyla Gardner and Serena Dai  on April 10, 2013 8:40pm

 A live goat is brought onto the field to 'remove a curse' placed on the Cubs during their last World Series appearence in 1945 before the Atlanta Braves take on the Cubs during Game 4 of their National League Division Series Oct. 4, 2003 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. A goat's head was delivered in a package addressed to Cubs owner Tom Ricketts on Wednesday, team spokesman Julian Green said.
A live goat is brought onto the field to 'remove a curse' placed on the Cubs during their last World Series appearence in 1945 before the Atlanta Braves take on the Cubs during Game 4 of their National League Division Series Oct. 4, 2003 at Wrigley Field in Chicago. A goat's head was delivered in a package addressed to Cubs owner Tom Ricketts on Wednesday, team spokesman Julian Green said.
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Brian Bahr/Getty Images (file)

CHICAGO — Wrigley Field hasn't had much luck in the past with farm animals entering its confines, according to legend, and another goat was an unwelcome ballpark guest Wednesday.

Police were called to the to Wrigley Field, 1060 W. Addison St., about 2:30 p.m. for a report of a "intimidating package," said Officer Veejay Zala, a police spokesman.

The package contained a severed goat's head, confirmed Cubs spokesman Julian Green. It was dropped off at Gate K and addressed to Cubs owner Tom Ricketts, Green said.

Green declined to "entertain" questions of whether the goat's head was cooked, heavy or smelled, as he did not see it, he said.

The baseball team and the city are in the midst of finalizing a $500 million deal to renovate the ballpark and develop the surrounding area.

The tug-of-war negotiations have drawn some backlash from neighborhood groups and Ald. Tom Tunny (44th) for effects on parking, blocked rooftop views by a jumbotron, and other concerns.

Wednesday, it was reported that the Cubs have proposed pushing exterior walls back onto Waveland Avenue and asked to be able to play as many as 55 night games, nearly doubling the number currently allowed.

Live, non-decapitated goats have been brought to Wrigley Field in years past in attempts to break the "Billy Goat Curse," which is said to be one of the reasons for the Cubs' 104-year World Series drought, according to legend.

The Cubs and Wrigley Field are 95 percent owned by a trust established for the benefit of the family of Joe Ricketts, owner and CEO of DNAinfo.com Chicago. Joe Ricketts has no direct involvement in the team's day-to-day operations.

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